How Does VR Work? Virtual Reality Explained


Virtual reality is the creation of a simulated environment that's so convincing, it feels like you're actually there. VR works by creating fake visual, auditory, and other sensory signals and sending them to your brain. Your brain perceives this information as a realistic experience, making you feel like you are somewhere else.


Virtual reality is the creation of a simulated environment that is so convincing, it feels like you’re actually there.


Virtual reality is a computer-generated environment that feels real. It can be either fully immersive, or it can be designed so you can see the real world as well.



Virtual reality (VR) immerses you in an artificial world. This experience makes it seem like you’re really there and interacting with objects in the virtual space just as you would in real life. With VR headsets and other hardware, your senses are tricked into believing this illusion by sending signals to your brain that mimic what happens when we see, hear, touch and smell something in our physical environment.


VR works by creating fake visual, auditory, and other sensory signals and sending them to your brain.


Virtual reality (VR) is a computer-generated simulation of a three-dimensional image or environment that can be interacted with in a seemingly real or physical way by a person using special electronic equipment, such as a headset with a screen inside the goggles.

In order to understand how VR works, you need to know that it creates a virtual environment that is so realistic, it feels like you are actually there. Here's how:

  • A VR headset displays images on its display screen

  • The headset also has sensors that track the user's head movements and adjust the images accordingly so they look correct when viewed through the lenses of the headset

  • Your brain receives visual information from your eyes and auditory information from your ears

  • VR immerses you in an artificial world, making it seem like you're actually there. Your brain perceives this information as a realistic experience, making you feel like you are somewhere else.

  • VR uses sensors and cameras to track your movements so that the graphics in your headset move accordingly.

Your brain perceives this information as a realistic experience, making you feel like you are somewhere else.


Today's headsets use stereoscopic lenses to achieve binocular vision so each eye sees a slightly different image.


When you look at the world, you can see things in 3D because your eyes are separated by a few inches and each eye has a slightly different field of view. That means they don't just share the same visual information, they actually perceive two slightly different images.

Your brain combines these two images into one and creates an image with depth — allowing you to perceive objects in 3D.


That's what happens in virtual reality headsets as well: each eye sees a slightly different image, which together give the illusion of depth and make for better immersion.

Today's headsets use stereoscopic lenses to achieve binocular vision so each eye sees a slightly different image. This creates depth perception, giving the virtual world a three-dimensional effect that imitates real life.


Another way that VR helps make virtual environments seem realistic is the way it bends light rays. The lenses in a VR headset also bend light rays to create the illusion of depth and distance, which helps make virtual spaces feel more realistic and immersive.

The lenses bend light rays so that the edges of the images being sent to our eyes look farther away than things in the center of our field of view. This can make objects that are farther away appear larger, giving us the impression of depth.


Live the experience of a lifetime with VR.



Virtual reality is exciting, but it's only just beginning to reach its potential.

People who are unable to leave their homes can travel the world in VR and explore places they would otherwise never be able to go. It's also being used for educational purposes—you can take virtual field trips through museums and other famous landmarks around the world.


VR will continue to improve over time as more developers create software that allows users to explore new worlds and interact with simulated objects as if they were real.